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The Housing Trust Fund Project of the Center for Community Change is pleased to offer this report summarizing our findings from a national survey of housing trust funds completed late in 2015. The report summarizes the characteristics of state, city and county housing trust funds in distinct sections, followed by a description of the progress with state enabling legislation in several states.

In this report, the Housing Trust Fund Project opted to highlight several trends we believe housing trust funds have contributed to the affordable housing field and ones that are important to pay attention to as we advance the role affordable housing plays in our communities.

These include:

● Highlighting the success of housing trust funds
● Preserving our investment in affordable housing
● Providing safe affordable homes for extremely low income households
● Preserving neighborhoods
● Addressing rural housing needs
● Ensuring quality energy efficiency
● Addressing homelessness

Housing trust funds, more often than not, evolve over time. Some are capitalized with initial one time funding, others build dedicated revenue as a second step, some continue building revenues adding new dedicated funds. What this report does show is that housing trust funds have established themselves as a sustainable and significant model. They are making a measurable contribution to efforts to redress this country’s approach to ensure a fundamental right to a safe affordable place to call home.

Attachments:
Download this file (HTF_Survey-Report-2016-final.pdf)HTF_Survey-Report-2016-final.pdf[ ]8507 kB

GAULEY BRIDGE — A $1.6 million housing project up Scrabble Creek Hollow is changing living accommodations for families struggling to make ends meet.

Kathy Kiser moved into her newly renovated apartment at Regina Three Rivers Apartments in Gauley Bridge on Valentine's Day, and she says she's still in love with her new place.

In her old unit, she was mostly confined to her bedroom because her wheelchair couldn't fit through the narrow door frames.

By Elyssa Kirkham, Editor

Buying a home is a financial goal that has been delayed for many Americans thanks to the recent recession. With the economy continuing to strengthen in 2015, however, many wannabe homeowners have decided it's time to buy their first homes.

by Rachel Molenda, Staff writer

Housing policy interest groups say housing doesn’t get the attention it deserves by the state’s lawmakers. But they hope that changes with the creation and work of the West Virginia Housing Policy Group.

“It always seems that’s it’s not on a high priority that those, of course, in housing seem to think it should be. So there’s always that effort to bring attention to it, to the need for housing,” said Lora Pierce, of West Virginia Habitat for Humanity.

Various people in the housing world are involved in this effort, including builders, lenders, realty agents and service providers. Some of them met on Thursday morning at the Embassy Suites hotel to discuss housing issues throughout the state.

housingcon15
The 2015 West Virginia Housing Conference has been scheduled for September 15, 16, and 17 at the Embassy Suites in Charleston, West Virginia. Visit our website – www.WVHousingConference.com to register or for more details!

The 2015 West Virginia Housing Conference is a place where agencies, organizations, and individuals from across West Virginia and across social and political ideals have come together to have a conference about the need for better housing for our people.

From sessions on design and maintenance and loan processing to sessions on forming better organizations and social services and needs of the elderly, this conference covers housing issues in the Mountain State.

Take a look at the schedule and you’ll see many topics of interest to you. Whether you’re a builder, a lender, a manager, a social worker, or just someone who agrees that “Housing Builds Strong Communities,” this conference is for you.

As one of our participants from last year said, “The sessions had something for everyone. There was a perfect mix of folks from within West Virginia and those bringing experience from other places.”

We hope you can join us at the 2015 West Virginia Housing Conference!

oor2015

The 2015 National Housing Wage is $19.35

Today, the National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC) released Out of Reach 2015. The report finds that nationally the housing wage, or the hourly wage a person working 40 hours per week would need to earn in order to afford a modest, two-bedroom rental unit, is $19.35.

At 2.7 times the federal minimum wage, this means that a minimum wage earner would need to work 86 hours per week to afford a one-bedroom apartment and 107 hours per week to afford a two-bedroom apartment. In fact, there is no state where someone earning the minimum wage can afford housing while working 40 hours per week or less.

As it does year after year, Out of Reach underscores the intense need for affordable housing in every state, metropolitan area, and county throughout the United States. The findings in Out of Reach provide a powerful tool for housing advocates.

This year NLIHC is enhancing this tool by launching a new interactive Out of Reach website. The site features charts, infographics, and maps, as well as an opportunity to compare data across jurisdictions. All data can easily be printed, downloaded, and shared via social media or email. The site also includes any news items related to Out of Reach, and a Twitter feed showing tweets with the hashtags #OOR2015 or #HousingWage.

Visit the new site today at www.nlihc.org/oor!

View the full Out of Reach 2015 report at http://nlihc.org/sites/default/files/oor/OOR_2015_FULL.pdf.

Habitat for Humanity West Virginia recently partnered with Marshall University's Center for Business and Economic Research Department to conduct an Economic and Social Impact Study.

A summary of the study revealed that Habitat for Humanity spent an average of nearly $4 million on operations and programs in the past three years, generating an additional $2.4 million in economic activity in WV.  Moreover, Habitat for Humanity supported 60 full time equivalent positions state-wide, and they generated approximately $95,000 in total tax revenue.

Additionally, the study of Habitat for Humanity families indicated great benefits of home ownership.  Eighty-six percent of West Virginia Habitat for Humanity homebuyers reported being happier since their move.  They reported an improvement in overall health including less stress. Families also reported that their children earned better grades and improved attendance in school.

Overall, families benefitted from the security, stability and sense of control that comes from homeownership.

The WV Affordable Housing Trust Fund is a proud partner of Habitat for Humanity West Virginia and many other non-profit housing organizations across the state. WVAHTF funding benefits some of our most vulnerable citizens.  We look forward to continued collaboration with Habitat for Humanity West Virginia and our other housing partners for many years to come.

nelsonapts
Staff from the WV Affordable Housing Trust Fund (Trust Fund) attended a ribbon cutting ceremony in Huntington this month.

Nelson Apartments was dedicated on April 2, 2015 by officials from the City of Huntington and Harmony House. 

The Cabell-Huntington Coalition for the Homeless transformed a dilapidated building, built in 1925, into six one-bedroom units to house some of Huntington’s homeless population.

The Trust Fund awarded $120,000 to the Nelson Apartments project located on 9th Street, West.  The Coalition is committed to developing permanent housing for people who are homeless. 

WV Affordable Housing Trust Fund Executive Director Marlena Mullins said, “I am so proud of the fact that the Trust Fund played an integral role in the rehabilitation of this building that will house homeless people in Huntington.  Nelson Apartments is now a place that offers security, shelter, and in many cases, peace of minda place to call home.”


Pictured above are those who successfully attained the certification:
Back row, left to right: Steve Fisher, Marlena Mullins, Darlene King, Zack Elliot, Chris Bontoft & Cathy Colby
Middle row, left to right: Marlo Long, Donna Martino, Misty Sheck, Niki Rowe-Fortner, Landen Burcham & Beth Blankenship
Front row, left to right: Megan Howard, Debra Payne, Teresa Sarver & Alice Carver


The Housing Development Finance Professional (HDFP) Certification Program, hosted by the WV Housing Development Fund, was presented by the National Development Council (NDC).  BB&T was a generous sponsor of the training program. 

The HDFP Certification Program is a four-course training program that explores the development process, financial analysis techniques and structuring and negotiating skills needed to successfully develop and finance affordable home ownership and rental housing development.  Case studies based on actual affordable housing development deals were presented during the course.  The training program was presented over a three month period. 

The National Development Council was established in 1969 and is a non-profit organization specializing in economic and housing development training and technical assistance for community development.

Mullins was among state housing leaders and a number of HDF staff attending the training program.  HDFP Certification is a professional credential given to individuals who successfully complete NDC’s housing development finance training series. 

“I am pleased to have participated in this training opportunity and to have earned the HDFP Certification.  This intensive training enlightened me to the ‘boots on the ground – in the trenches’ activities that our housing partners experience each day,” Mullins said.  “I have an immense appreciation and admiration for the work they do to provide affordable housing to qualifying individuals and families in our state.”

 



Ending veteran homelessness in West Virginia.

Host: Billy Wayne Bailey
Guests: Marlena Millins & David

CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS
Please Submit By March 2, 2015

Housing Builds Strong Communities
September 15-17, 2015
Embassy Suites - Charleston, WV

The Planning Committee of the West Virginia Housing Conference is pleased to announce the call for presentations for the 2015 West Virginia Housing Conference.  This conference will address the importance of housing and issues related, but not limited to: workforce housing, elder housing, policy and regulation, housing creation, housing management, finance/funding, and homelessness.

How to Submit an Abstract:

Please submit your abstract information below.  You will not be able to save the application form, so please consider preparing and saving your content in a separate document before completing.  The deadline for submitting an abstract is Monday, March 2, 2015.

All sessions are 90 minutes in length. If your presentation is selected, your conference registration will be waived for the day of your session (will include one meal and the opportunity to attend other sessions).  Presenters will be notified by April 15, 2015.

If you have questions or need additional information, please contact Mary Skeens at mskeens@communityworkswv.org, or Mark Taylor at mtaylor@ckha.com.

Thank you for your interest! 

Mel Watt, Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, who oversees Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, announced on December 11th that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will begin allocating funding to the National Housing Trust Fund (NHTF) and the Capital Magnet Fund (CMF).  

The NHTF was established in July 2008 as part of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA). HERA required that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac pay 4.2 basis points of their annual volume of business to the two funds – 65% to the NHTF and the remaining 35% to the CMF.  The requirement that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac contribute to the two funds was suspended when the companies were taken into conservatorship in September 2008 at the height of the housing crisis.  With the lifting of the suspension now, the first funds are expected to be allocated in early 2016.

This is a huge victory for West Virginia.  Our State Legislators created the Affordable Housing Trust Fund in 2001.  Thanks to their proactive measures and the diligent, tireless efforts many individuals, including the Friends of the Trust Fund, West Virginia is ready.

When the Federal funding becomes available, it will flow directly to the WV Affordable Housing Trust Fund.

FAHE’s 2014 annual conference was in September in Charleston, WV.  View highlights….

Jim’s opening speech: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aZTa-Mctyms
Gayle Manchin: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UxE1HvsGDs
David Zuckerman: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVy-5fOqioc
Hal Rogers Acceptance Speech: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RdLN-kJ95I
8,000 units video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itHX7txgrhY
Pom pom: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBxGOIvH1yU
The Nott Brothers and Bob Reeder: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CB9XLjQFqPk

Over the years, the housing needs for West Virginia’s residents – our seniors, veterans, families, and hard-working individuals – have changed.   A more holistic approach is being considered to begin meeting these changes for our citizens.  Supporting and strengthening individuals and families in all aspects of their lives is equally important as we consider housing needs.
 
This year, many organizations came together to address the state’s housing needs.  The first annual WV Housing Conference was hosted in Charleston to begin the dialog.  Speakers, workshops and sessions at the 2014 WV Housing Conference included a myriad of topics and was attended by more than 300 people.  See more about the conference online here.

September 14, 2015, Charleston WV — The WV Affordable Housing Trust Fund Executive Director Marlena Mullins participated in a discussion hosted by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development on September 3rd.

HUD hosted a Rural Gateway Peer-to-Peer conference, The State of Infrastructure in Rural America: A Discussion of Best Practices, to explore programs available through the US Department of Transportation and the President’s government-wide initiative called the Build America Investment Initiative.  

Participants discussed opportunities to increase infrastructure investment and economic growth by engaging with state and local governments and private sector investors to encourage collaboration, expand the market for public-private partnerships and put federal credit programs to greater use.  Starting with the transportation sector, this initiative will harness the potential of private capital to complement government funding.  

This group’s discussion echoes the Crossing Systems Initiative developed by the Trust Fund last year with funds from a Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation grant.  

The Trust Fund developed the Crossing Systems Initiative as the framework for a statewide training and technical assistance system designed to increase the organizational capacity of local agencies and organizations to better serve families in the state.  The Crossing Systems Initiative is designed to allow individuals and families access to safe, decent, and affordable housing and high-quality, essential family services. 

September 14, 2015, Charleston WV — The WV Affordable Housing Trust Fund Executive Director Marlena Mullins participated in a 2-day workshop sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development last month at the state capitol called the H2 WV Action Planning Group.

The group came together to develop an innovative model to provide financial, technical support, development, and testing of a state led multi-player health care and housing provider plan to improve health system performance, increase quality of care, and decrease costs for the state’s homeless population.

At the workshop, Mullins joined other WV stakeholders including officials from the Greater Wheeling Coalition for the Homeless and Cabell-Huntington Coalition for the Homeless.  These two WV homeless coalitions received technical assistance grants from HUD to develop a plan for innovative funding and services delivery strategies for integrating health care into the housing system.  

The West Virginia Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board of Directors (Trust Fund) awarded $870,000, this month, to fund fifteen projects in the state.  

Upon completion, the projects will create 191 affordable housing units for low to moderate income state citizens.  The funding will also provide homebuyer counseling to many West Virginians as they consider purchasing and maintaining a home. 

Organizations receiving awards include:  Coalfield Development Corporation $20,000; Fairmont Morgantown Housing Authority $15,000; Greater Wheeling Coalition for the Homeless $15,000; Housing Authority of Mingo County $20,000; Huntington WV Area Habitat for Humanity, Inc. $50,000; Logan County Commission $20,000; Mon County Habitat for Humanity, Inc. $135,000; Monroe County Council on Aging, Inc. $20,000; Rea of Hope, Inc. $15,000; Southern Appalachian Labor School $15,000; Woodlands Development Group $100,000; Cabell Huntington Coalition for the Homeless $125,000; Central Appalachia Empowerment Zone of WV, Corp. $120,000; Housing Development Corp. $150,000; and Randolph County Housing Authority $50,000.

In the fourteen years since its inception, the Trust Fund has been instrumental in the creation and preservation of affordable housing, strengthening families, and stabilizing communities.  The Trust Fund is a vital part of the economy in the state. 

Since 2008, the Trust Fund has provided more than $7.7 million to 52 local government and nonprofit agencies for housing projects in WV.  For each dollar of Trust Fund money, an average of $3 is leveraged in other federal, state, or private funding.

Adopts 100% of HUD Median Family Income Limits for Housing; and Adopts New Guidelines for their Loan Programs 

The West Virginia Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board of Directors (Trust Fund) awarded $870,000, today, to fund fifteen projects in the state. Upon completion, the projects will yield 191 affordable housing units throughout WV. The awards will go to housing organizations that will provide affordable housing and homebuyer counseling for low to moderate income state citizens.

The Trust Fund Board also adopted the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Median Family Income (MFI) Guidelines at 100% and below. In the past, qualifying families and individuals earned 80% and below of the HUD MFI. Adopting the MFI at 100% will allow more state citizens to qualify for affordable housing and related services.

According to HUD, the WV statewide income median is $54,000 for a family of four. The chart below depicts MFI family size annual salary adjustments by family size.

Number of Persons In Family 

1

$37,800 

2

$43,200 

3

$48,600 

4

$54,000 

5

58,320 

6

$62,640 

7

$66,960 

8

$71,280 

In additional business today, the Trust Fund Board adopted new guidelines for its forgivable and revolving loan programs. These significant changes will streamline the process and expedite funding for housing provider organizations to provide affordable housing and related services to qualifying families and individuals.

The Trust Fund works with housing providers in the state to finance capacity building efforts, homebuyer counseling programs, new construction and rehabilitation projects, and predevelopment needs through a request for proposal program.

Since its creation in 2001 by the WV Legislature, the Trust Fund has provided more than $7 million to 52 local government and nonprofit agencies for a total of 147 projects throughout the state. The Trust fund has worked to become instrumental in the creation or preservation of affordable housing that strengthens families and stabilizes communities and has become a vital part of the economy in West Virginia. 

The West Virginia Affordable Housing Trust Fund (Trust Fund) is accepting proposals from eligible organizations to provide affordable housing for extremely low to moderate income households.  RFP No. 2015-01 was released on January 30, 2015.
Eligible organizations include local 501(c) (3) nonprofits located, units of local government, public housing authorities, and regional or statewide nonprofit housing assistance organizations.  All organizations must be located and licensed to do business in West Virginia.

The Trust Fund works with housing providers in the state to finance capacity building efforts, homebuyer counseling programs, and predevelopment needs.  Additionally, the Trust Fund supports new construction and rehabilitation projects for low to moderate income citizens of the state.

Since its creation in 2001 by the WV Legislature, the Trust Fund has provided more than $6.9 million to 52 local government and nonprofit agencies for a total of 132 projects throughout the state.  The Trust fund has worked to become instrumental in the creation or preservation of affordable housing that strengthens families and stabilizes communities and has become a vital part of the economy in West Virginia.  

March 20th, 2015 is the deadline to submit proposals to the Trust Fund for RFP No. 2015-01. 

The West Virginia Affordable Housing Trust Fund awarded one million dollars this week to fourteen WV entities to improve housing for many West Virginia citizens.

The Affordable Housing Trust Fund works with housing providers in the state to finance capacity building efforts, homebuyer counseling programs, and predevelopment needs.  The Trust Fund also supports new construction and rehabilitation projects for low- to moderate-income West Virginians.

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